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A STUDY ON EFFECT OF PERCEIVED A

A STUDY ON EFFECT OF PERCEIVED ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT ON THE LEVEL OF INFERIORITY AND INSECURITY FEELING

Manoranjan Tripathy* S.K. Srivastava**

*M.A. Final Student, Department of Psychology.

**Professor of  Psychology Haridwar, Uttrakhand

Abstract


Academic achievement has been and continues to be one of the most important values held in highly arrives in all cultures, countries and times. Scholastic achievement has been therefore an important development task, which the pre-adolescents and the adolescents are expected to attain. Education, it is hoped, wideness the mind & trains the critical faculties of thought and judgment. Hence it has always been valued by all societies and cultures. In society today, academic performance plays an essential role in many peoples’ lives. The present study aims to examine the relationship between the academic achievement and inferiority & insecurity feeling. This research attempt to determine that academic achievement can effect on the level of inferiority & insecurity feeling in school going children. It is recognized by the result that the level of inferiority & insecurity feeling, both variables have been effected by the academic achievement. So we concentrate for this study.

Hypothesis 1: There is no significant difference on the level of inferiority feeling among high academic achiever & low academic achiever persons.

Hypothesis 2: There is no significant difference on the level of insecurity feeling among high academic achiever & low academic achiever persons.

Method and procedure- For the study, sample size of 100 was selected through Quota sampling technique from the Dev Sanskriti Vishwavidyalaya, Haridwar, (Uttarakhand). Which was selected from two groups i.e. 50 from high academic achievement and 50 from low academic achievement and they were again devided into two subgroups of 25 males and 25 females. For measurement of ‘Inferiority & Insecurity feelings’ researcher used Inferiority & Insecurity Questionnaires. The inventor of this test is Dr. G.G. Pati; Mental Health Institution, SCB Medical College, Cuttack (Orissa).

Result: High academic achiever persons have low inferiority feeling than low academic achiever persons. High academic achiever persons have low insecurity feeling than low academic achiever persons.

Conclusion: The results indicated that there was no significant relationship between feeling of security-insecurity and academic achievement.


Introduction


The world is becoming more and more competitive. Quality of performance has become the key factor for personal progress. Parents desire that their children climb the ladder of performance to as high a level as possible. This desire for a high level of achievement puts a lot of pressure on students, teachers, schools, and in general, the educational system itself. In fact, it appears as if the, whole system of education revolves round the academic achievement of students, though various other outcomes are also expected from the system. Thus a lot of time and effort of the schools are used for helping students to achieve better in their scholastic endeavors.

Behind every achievement that we see in this world today, is the unseen hand of the human self-confidence. The material comforts scientific achievements are all the products crystallized out of the human self-confidence and determination. The human self-confidence conquered nature and made slave for the welfare of mankind, and in the process, can even create the things which were not even available in the world before. Behind all the technological progresses are the determined efforts of hundreds of dedicated men and women, who faced all the challenges to make their dream, comes true.

Many of what we see today as solid facts of life and proof of man’s achievements were only mere ideas yesterday in the minds of a few men of great self-confidence. Those ideas would not have become realities, had they not put the will and determination to their ideas into practice. Our scriptures too have given us examples of men of great self-confidence, like Viswamitra who could even create a new world outfit sheer out of will power & self-confidence also. All men of achievement had the blessing of tremendous will power in their makeup, and History is full of names of such men of achievement.

It is everywhere seen that in this remaking of one’s destiny, there is negative and there is a positive approach. The negative approach essentially is careful observance of the quality and texture of our thoughts, detecting the dissipations within, and eradicating those false values and wrong tendencies in our thought-patterns. To have Thus, a healthy mind within-one that has learned to negate and weed out its unproductive jungles of thought-is the secret of living in physical well-being, in harmony and happiness. Many studies have been done in the field of academic achievement. In a study (2) found homeless and housed children had comparable rates of absenteeism and other school-related problems, which may explain why homeless and housed children were similar in terms of achievement. Although children of color were equivalent to non-Latino White children in terms of nonverbal intellectual ability, their lower academic achievement scores suggest that they are not reaching their academic potential. In another study author explained (I,6,13) homeless students were rehoused showed that both groups valued school highly and were similar in cognitive abilities assessed with the similarities subtest of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children—Revised (WISC-R). Formerly homeless students had more school mobility, more grade retention, and worse school experiences by mother report and lower plans for post-secondary education by self-report. Both groups scored poorly on standardized tests of academic achievement. Homelessness was associated with further declines in achievement during the period of maximal residential disruption, but did not have effects 5 years later. 

Physical health and mental health is also an important factor for achievement. Lack of health decreases the performance it is quit true similar study (1) was found of treatment for bilateral secretary otitis media was correlated to minor group difference in the mean of grades, but not to any significant difference in the individual grades or in the choice of further studies. Having many episodes of acute otitis before the age of four was uncorrelated to lower grades and to fewer tendencies to continue with theoretical studies. The results gender (8) difference revealed that LD status had indirect influence on self-efficacy via the source variable; gender did not have direct or indirect influences on self-efficacy. (3,11) last in the study relationships from academic, social, and self-regulatory efficacy on academic achievement found academic and self-regulatory efficacy had an indirect negative effect through delinquency and a direct positive effect on academic achievement. Academic and social self-efficacy had positive and negative relationships, respectively, with academic aspiration and academic achievement; however, the relationship between academic aspiration and academic achievement was not significant. Similarly another study have been found (9,11) gender differences in 5 areas of early achievement: applied problems (math), general knowledge, letter–word identification, expressive vocabulary, and sound awareness. Behavioral self-regulation was measured using both an objective direct measure (N = 268; Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task) and, for a sub sample of children, a teacher report of classroom self-regulatory behavior (n = 156; Child Behavior Rating Scale). Results showed that gender differences in self-regulation were clear, no significant gender differences were found on the 5 academic achievement outcomes, as measured by the Woodcock–Johnson III Tests of Achievement. Structural equation modeling analyses corroborated a conceptual model in which teachers' personal efficacy beliefs affected their job satisfaction and students' academic achievement, controlling for previous levels of achievement.(3) The results offer promising evidence that a broad focus on building the developmental nutrients in young people's lives may contribute to academic success (14).

Objective and Hypothesis

The present study aims to establish relationship between the effect of perceived academic achievement on the level of inferiority & insecurity feeling having following hypothesis

1.       Hypothesis 1: There is no significant difference on the level of inferiority feeling among high academic achiever & low academic achiever persons.

2.       Hypothesis 2: There is no significant difference on the level of insecurity feeling among high academic achiever & low academic achiever persons.

Methods and Materials

For the study, sample size of 100 was selected through Quota sampling technique from the Dev Sanskriti Vishwavidyalaya, Haridwar, (Uttarakhand). Which was selected from two groups i.e. 50 from high academic achievement and 50 from low academic achievement and they were again devided into two subgroups of 25 males and 25 females. For measurement of ‘Inferiority & Insecurity feelings’ researcher used Inferiority & Insecurity Questionnaires. The inventor of this test is Dr. G.G. Pati; Mental Health Institution, SCB Medical College, Cuttack (Orissa).

Results and Discussion

In this Research Paper mainly two types hypothesis have been formulated. Each hypothesis will be discussed below.

Hypothesis 1: There is no significant difference on the level of inferiority feeling among high academic achiever & low academic achiever persons.

On the basis of the table 1 and graph, the mean scores of the high academic achiever persons and low academic achiever persons are 28.76 and 36.54 respectively on inferiority feeling. The SD’s of the high academic achiever persons and low academic achiever persons are 16.90 and 14.72 respectively. The t-test was used to assess the significance of the hypothesis. The obtained CR-value is 2.45, since the obtained CR-value is more than the table value at 0.05 level of confidence and less than the table value at 0.01 level of confidence for df = 98. So, there is significance difference on the level of inferiority feeling among high academic achiever persons and low academic achiever persons.

Table 1: Comparison between High and Low academic achiever persons on inferiority feeling.

Group

N

Inferiority Scores

SED

CR

Significant at

0.05 level

Mean

SD

High Academic Achiever Persons

50

28.76

16.90

 

3.17

 

2.45

Low Academic Achiever Persons

50

36.54

14.72

    df = 98

Graphical presentation of Table 1

Since the hypothesis 1 is rejected. So, we can say that high academic achiever persons have low inferiority feeling than low academic achiever persons.

Insecurity felling or emotional insecurity is a concept well known. The term “feeling of Insequrity” refers to a family of representations and affects that reflect an individual’s self-evaluation in relation to others. The construct of insecurity can be defined as intimate, intellectual capacities (Mona El-Sekh, Joseph A, Buckhalt, Pegg S. Keller, E. Mark Cummings, Christine Acebo 2007). Those with emotional attachment to the family are more likely to be having feelings of insecurity. The feeling of insecurity arises when a person fails himself in every work. Due to the failure in every step of life he develops negative thoughts in his mind. Hence, he perceives himself with negative attitude.

Hypothesis 2: There is no significant difference on the level of insecurity feeling among high academic achiever & low academic achiever persons.

Table 2: Comparison between High and Low academic achiever persons on insecurity feeling.

Group

N

Insecurity Scores

SED

CR

Significant at
0.01 level

Mean

SD

High Academic Achiever Persons

50

20.66

16.31

3.64

3.21

Low Academic Achiever Persons

50

32.36

19.94

    df = 98

Graphical presentation of Table 2

On the basis of the table 2 and graph, the mean scores of the high academic achiever persons and low academic achiever persons are 20.66 and 32.36 respectively on insecurity feeling. The SD’s of the high academic achiever persons and low academic achiever persons are 16.31 and 19.94 respectively. The t-test was used to assess the significance of the hypothesis. The obtained CR-value is 3.21, since the obtained CR-value is more than the table value at 0.01 level of confidence for df = 98. So, there is significance difference on the level of insecurity feeling among high academic achiever persons and low academic achiever persons.

Since the hypothesis 2 is also rejected. So, we can say that high academic achiever persons have low insecurity feeling than low academic achiever persons.

Inferiority complex or extremely low self-esteem is a concept we are all familiar with. Chances are we or someone you know suffers from this complex. The term “feeling of inferiority” refers to a group of representations and affects that reflect an individual’s self-evaluation in relation to others. The construct of inferiority can be defined as intimate physical capacities (Colin Wayne Leach and Russell Spears 2008). Those with low self-esteem are more likely to be more likely to have feelings of resentment, alienation and unhappiness. The feeling of inferiority arises when a person fails himself in every work. Due to the failure in every step of life he develops negative thoughts in his mind. Hence, he perceives himself with negative attitude.

Conclusion

In present research work “A study on effect of perceived academic achievement on the level of inferiority and insecurity feeling” examine the relationship between the inferiority & insecurity feeling with academic achievement. These research attempts determine that academic achievement effect on the level of inferiority & insecurity feeling in school going children. It is recognized by the result of this field study that the level of the inferiority & insecurity feeling, both variables have effected to academic achievement.

Hence, we can conclude that the academic achievement affects the level of inferiority & insecurity feeling of human being. But, there are many large scaled researches which are against to the result of the present study in the view of insecurity feeling of adolescents.

The results indicated that there was no significant relationship between feeling of security-insecurity and academic achievement. So, we conclude that in the point of view of insecurity feeling academic achievement may be a controversial topic.

References


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